Fallen Angels [New Restoration] (1995)

  • Romance, Crime
  • 1h 36m
  • Hong Kong


Price: $11.99 + taxes and fees

NEW RESTORATION!
This 4K digital restoration was undertaken from the 35mm original camera negative by the Criterion Collection in collaboration with L’Immagine Ritrovata and Jet Tone. It was supervised and approved by Wong Kar Wai.

Fallen Angels is newly presented in the 2.39:1 aspect ratio, a format that Wong had originally envisioned for the film. “The restoration provides the opportunity to realize our artistic intention that we couldn’t have achieved technically 25 years ago,” says the director.

Bonus Content: Included in your film rental is over two hours of bonus content, including a video essay by TIFF Cinematheque Senior Programmer and world-renowned film expert James Quandt and never-before-seen archival interviews with frequent Wong Kar Wai cinematographer Christopher Doyle. Scroll down to watch.

Birthed from story material that Wong had originally developed for Chungking Express, Fallen Angels criss-crosses the paths of a memorable set of characters.

“Wong Kar-wai’s quintessential movie…. A pyrotechnical wonder about mystery, solitude, and the irrational love of movies” –J. Hoberman, The Village Voice

Birthed from story material that Wong had originally developed for Chungking Express, Fallen Angels criss-crosses the paths of a memorable set of characters — a hitman (Leon Lai), his “agent” (Michelle Reis) who is smitten with him, a mute delinquent who lives in the agent’s building (Takeshi Kaneshiro), and the forlorn young woman the delinquent falls in love with (Charlie Yeung) — around whom Wong deploys an arsenal of visual effects, all designed to disorient: Wellesian angles and distortions, frenetic cutting, hot colours, refracted light. In either deluge (half the film takes place in a monsoon) or desertion (spaces are often empty, in one of the most crowded places on earth), Hong Kong becomes a dream setting of disconnected lives and random violence, while Wong occasionally punctuates the sense of reverie with nouvelle vague–style japes (e.g. a jukebox that plays Laurie Anderson, perfect accompaniment for masturbation).

Content advisory: explicit violence, sexual content

Director

Wong Kar Wai

Languages

Cantonese, Mandarin, Taiwanese, Japanese, English

Bonus Content

86 mins
In Conversation With... Christopher Doyle

2011’s extended conversation with Wong Kar Wai’s legendary cinematographer, Christopher Doyle.

21 mins
Wong Kar Wai: A to Z with James Quandt

Renowned film expert and TIFF’s Senior Programmer James Quandt breaks down Wong Kar Wai from A to Z.