The Trotsky (2009)

  • Comedy
  • 2h 0m
  • Canada


Price: $4.99 + taxes and fees

Boasting a great cast led by Jay Baruchel, Jacob Tierney’s comedy asks serious questions about the ways we dismiss those who oppose the status quo.

Jacob Tierney’s hilarious second feature, The Trotsky, follows Leon Bronstein (Jay Baruchel, in one of his finest turns), a precocious Montreal teen who fervently believes himself to be the reincarnation of Leon Trotsky. Leon is determined to duplicate every aspect of the Marxist revolutionary’s life, including being exiled (twice), finding both his Lenin and an older wife (preferably one named Alexandra). When he tries to unionize his father’s factory after working there for a day, he’s removed from his ritzy private school as punishment. Forced to enroll in a public high school, Leon’s revolutionary zeal is immediately tested when he butts heads with the dictatorial principal (Colm Feore). But do the students give a damn about Leon’s battles to improve their lot, or are they fundamentally apathetic, as the principal maintains?

Unreservedly Canadian, The Trotsky boasts a phenomenal cast including Saul Rubinek, Anne-Marie Cadieux, Michael Murphy, Genevieve Bujold, Liane Balaban, the multi-talented Kaniehtiio Horn (Possessor; Letterkenny), and Emily Hampshire (Schitt’s Creek), as Leon’s intended. (Tierney, himself a veteran actor and one of the principal creative forces behind Letterkenny, has a pivotal cameo.) Spirited fun, the film also asks serious questions about the depth of our commitment to change, and how we view activism with jaundiced and cynical eyes. In The Trotsky, laughter is revolutionary.

STEVE GRAVESTOCK

Official Selection, 2009 Toronto International Film Festival

Content advisory: coarse language

Director

Jacob Tierney

Language

English

Captions

English